Deep peace of the quiet earth to you. 

July 3, 2017

This weekend, I spent my mornings in the gardens, both cultivated and wild, vegetable and herb and flower. Around 9:30am, once the heavy work of the day was done, dew dried from flowers, I collected wild roses, calendula, catmint, chamomile, self-heal, red clover, lady's mantle, looked for St. John's Wort (or St. Joan's Wort, as Susun Weed says; either way, too early for it), then gathered thyme, sage, basil, and rosemary. I t...

December 14, 2016

For some reason, we have such a hard time moving one logical knowledge set across a very narrow space into another. 

Take, for instance, coffee. Or tea. They're stimulants; they wake you up. If you depend on them for too long, then suddenly cut the supply, you get a headache (often, anyway). In the right amount, they help the body eliminate waste. Too much? The opposite effect occurs. Coffee can relieve constipation, black tea...

January 24, 2016

Ayurvedic Love For Yogis:**
 

I first learned about Soma formula when I studied at 7 Centers Yoga Arts in Sedona, Arizona.

(And, by the way, if you're looking for a place to retreat, to find yourself, to be in one of the most powerful, natural places on earth, I urge you to go when you can and stay as long as you can. Seven Centers changed my life). 

 

So. That being said, we can move on. ;)

 

Herbs can be essential in a yoga...

January 24, 2016

 

I love, love (dare I say luuuurve?) making my own remedies, from home- to skin/self-care products.

 

I mean, serious DIY herby dorkness happening over here. 

 

So, I thought it high time to share my DIY laundry soap recipe with you sweet, fellow herby-nerds. 

The following homemade laundry soap is safe for you, for sensitive skin, and your septic system. It can even be used in front-loading washers.

 

Now, to the Borax controve...

January 16, 2016

Ever wonder why winter is so nostalgically and closely associated with fragrant and comforting herbs (spices, actually) like cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg and why they feature so heavily in our cold-weather baking?
 

For one, they’re extremely warming (try putting a little cinnamon or ginger on your tongue and see what happens), which is good for the body in the midst of winter. These heating herbs bring blood to the surfac...

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Love herbs? Here's a little DIY Haircare for you. :) 

 DIY Herbal Skincare 

Allergy season! Tune in here for allergy help. Remember, if you try Ginkgo, top it off at 240mg/day, less if you get abdominal discomfort. Another thing to try: 1,000mg Vitamin C/day. If you have digestive discomfort with that amount, dial it back a bit.

Hi all! Here's a little DIY cough syrup demo for you. Sorry about the sun! I do step out of it eventually...guess I forgot to close the shades. Apologies! You can find herbs for this project at Mountain Rose Herbs.

 

As for the usual disclaimers: This info, as much of what we herbalists do, is technically for educational purposes only. Know that this information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Please consult a physician if you are pregnant or nursing.

 

Children under the age of one should not ingest honey.

Turmeric (Curcuma Longa) is an incredible herb for treating inflammation. Here are a few of my favorite ways to use it. There is tons of research out there on this herb, so feel free to click around and read about the exciting possibilities of turmeric.

 

A few standard precautions that I borrowed from the good people at Mountain Rose Herbs, since they have stated it so well: "As is the case with so many herbs, turmeric should be used in moderation. Too much turmeric used for extended periods of time may cause stomach distress. Since turmeric is included in Ayurvedic formulas for birth control, women trying to become pregnant should limit their consumption of the herb, and it should be avoided entirely while pregnant. Excessive use of turmeric should also be avoided in people with congestive heart failure. The curcumin in turmeric activates a gene called p53. This gene deactivates damaged cells in the heart".

 

And remember: This info, as much of what we herbalists do, is technically for educational purposes only. Know that this information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

This Quiet Earth